Mon, Apr 11 – Wed, Apr 13, 2022, 11:00–16:30

Vacation special: Photos from the shoebox

The magic of the camera obscura and pinhole camera
Junior Workshops
Camera Obscura Junior Workshop C/O Berlin Education © C/O Berlin Foundation, Iris Janke.jpg
Team

Laura Braun
Alina Simmelbauer   

Alter

10–14 Jahre

Hygiene

Vaccinated/Recovered/Tested

Anmeldung

60 Euro inkl. Snack
Frauke Menzinger
education@co-berlin.org

Have you ever heard of a camera obscura? Cameras are expensive, complicated devices that you buy in the store, right? Mostly yes - but not always.

In this workshop, we will focus on building a camera obscura, which is how photography began. The camera obscura is a camera to get into, and once inside, a magical experiment begins. But how does a camera obscura work? It's a dark room with a hole in the wall. Here, the outside world is projected through the hole onto the back wall of the room and so the outside environment becomes the image.

In the photo workshop, we build our own pinhole cameras with sheet metal, needles, cardboard, and tape and use them on forays in the surroundings of C/O Berlin. We then develop the resulting images ourselves in the darkroom and enjoy the resulting photographs - all without a camera!

This workshop provides young people with knowledge and offers hands-on practice in analog photography and its techniques.

 

Laura Braun is a freelance photographer. She studied art and design at Central St Martins College and photography and sociology at Goldsmiths College in London. She works both editorially and commercially and her work has been exhibited internationally.  In 2011 she founded the photo book publishing company Paper Tigers Books.

Alina Simmelbauer is a freelance photographer and media educator in Berlin. She studied photography at Burg Giebichenstein Kunsthochschule Halle and at ISA Instituto Superior de Arte Havana, Cuba. In 2020, she graduated from the master class at the Ostkreuzschule für Fotografie Berlin under the direction of Prof. Ute Mahler and Ingo Taubhorn. In her artistic works she focuses on the exploration of identity and family. For her current project García's Daughter she received project funding from the Kulturstiftung Thüringen.

Supported by
Karl Schlecht Stiftung